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of egypt, india, algeria and africa clearly did not forget the progressives' view of educated elites and by their definitions were close to, quote, unworthy of life, unquote. but these trends would marinate for a decade. in the meantime, american prosperity continued spreading to the rest of the civilized world. american advertisers, film, even literature became highly desired in europe. it's another irony at this time, american movies followed a production code that emphasized universal american themes of patriotism. god, fair play, and they avoided sensationalism, sexual situations and other taboo vices. american movies sold american sensualism including, quote, puritanical mormonism, as one put it. they occasionally made fun of those values through the work of buster keaton and charlie chaplin, but this was never meant to totally undermine the system itself. by 1930 the u.s. had 18,000 movie houses and compared to france's 2400 and britain's 3,000. europe simply could not compete with hollywood, and as long as hollywood sold american exceptionalism, europeans wanted to be like mik
, and egypt, just by training and shared one of the important department at the university of chicago before he took up this job a couple years ago. >> is it coincidental he is a direct descendant of reverent bliss or is that on purpose? >> it is the happy coincidence. he is an extremely well credentialed and capable scholar, administrator but he has a personal passion for the school because of his family connection. >> who owns the american university or who runs it? >> the faculty of middle eastern. the vast majority of students -- >> is associated with a religion or another school? >> it is deliberately secular and nonsectarian. >> what does it cost to go there for your? >> i have no idea. >> what did it cost in reverend bliss at today's? >> i don't know the answer to that question either but i do know that over time it began to open its doors not just the offspring of the elite but people of all ethnicities, classes and religions and its appeal has its merits. >> how is it viewed in a lease currently and how was it viewed when reverend bliss opened it? >> those are two separate question.
control of the house. the tax cut deal, fights over the budget, the debt ceiling, deficit reduction, egypt, libya, and how obama's made the decision and took the actions he to go up but to explain how this is done to set up the 2012 campaign. he had a theory he could make the 2012 race a choice between different approaches to government and everything he did he tried to temper temper -- to other at to a choice. we did not know how things would end up on 2012 but i looked at his governing and elected strategy and it culminated. this is the back story of what happened in the presidential campaign. >> host: david corn. showdown is his most recent book that the national press club >> host: professor, we are here to talk about your book indispensable. i want to say this is a delightful book to read. you deal with very familiar figures. you attack them from some new angles. let's died 10. you have a quote but is attributed to different people also charles de gaulle is most often accredited. what does it mean? >> appropriately it has a dual meaning that people call them sells indispensable and th
ambassadors from north korea to the middle east including egypt. a lot of arms trade in financial transaction. and overall, bell bought a lot of information, but melanie n.j. both pointed out that the number of elite his tutor 3,000. there is no analogous situation. it is just a group that have been brought in. and it's them against everybody else. >> thank you. >> i think it would be interesting, over here, the general way in which you share the stories. somehow a great deal of apprehension. if you could just elaborate the process by which you went to miss some of the instances by wish you secured the stories which ellis. >> well, thank you. one of the things i learned early on, and is not surprising is that talking about these stories is very difficult for many north koreans. it is painful to relive these memories. and i tried to do it in a slow way to allow them to take the lead rather than be, you know, kind of get out my wall street journal aggressive reporting skills. by one of the aspects of my book that is, i think, different from other things that have been written about north korea
to egypt with carter and sadat. i used to work for "the new york times." jim and i met in 1975, also, covering the bicentennial, election conquered. and we've been friends ever since throughout all the came pains, and i've seen sam over the campaigns. and jeanne livingston has been an associate for many years. >> what's this photograph? >> yes. that's the photograph that sort of symbolizes campaigning today and what the press has to go through. what we're seeing here is a rope line where the advance people for a certain candidate, in this case the dukakis people, try and control the press. that is, their movements, their acksess, where they're to go and not to go. and what had been happening in the dukakis campaign is we would land in an airport. there would be two advance people and there would be a clothe line, and they had like a mobile pin, instead of just a closed off pin, where the press would be able to go to. they got this wonderful idea of having a mobile pen. so you had two people, one with rope in each hand, running around making makeshift pens where the press could go. we
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5